COPD and Managing Allergies

Having COPD and allergies gives you added respitory problems. The two aren’t related, but having allergies can worsen your COPD symptoms. With allergies the COPD patient has a lot to fight. Coughing and wheezing increase as well as the mucos builds up and viruses and bacteria can settle in airways. These things can need immediate medical attention and increases the likelihood of life-threatening flare-ups.

There are several ways to reduce the symptoms.Run an air purifer in your home 24 hours a day. Use a HEPA filter vacuum cleaner and hypoallergenic covers for mattresses, pillows and box springs. The ULPA and HEPA filters are your best choice for heating and air conditioning sustems. You won’t want the air to dry too much especially if you use supplemental oxygen. Using a dehumidifer to help improve indoor air is a good idea.

If your nose is clogged you might want to talk to your doctor about using a nasal spray to help clear your passages. There are several over the counter medications such as antihistamines like cetirizine hydrochloride or loratadine and fexofenadine hydrochloride which block the effects of chemical histamines that trigger symptoms such as itchy eyes, sneezing and runny nose. Incase of severe allergy and inflammation oral steroids like prednisone can be taken for 7-10 days. Start allergy meds long before the allergy season begins.

Declutter your home. Stuff gathers dust so try to keep surfaces clean especially in the bathroom. Ban dogs from the bedroom.If you have pets and allergies their dander can actually be making the allergies worse. Pollen counts are highest between 10a. and 4p. so try to limit your outdoor time during these times. Don’t hang clothes out to dry because they collect pollen and dust. If you must be outside do so after a rain fall. The rain washes away pollen out of the air for afew hours.

Previous ArticleNext Article

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Anti-bot validation *